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Compex Electric Muscle Stimulator with TENS Blog

Get Stronger, Faster, Without Working Harder.

  1. How to Loosen Tight Muscles

    How to Loosen Tight Muscles

    Tight muscles can limit mobility, range of motion, and keep you from engaging in your favorite activities. Loosening tight muscles will help you stick to your exercise regimen, in addition to making you more comfortable. Find out how to loosen tight muscles with this step-by-step guide.

    But First. Why Do Muscles Become Tight?

    There are a number of reasons our muscles become tight, the most common being:

    1. Long periods of inactivity - this doesn’t just apply to couch potatoes, but active people as well. Even if you are working out regularly, being seated at a desk for long periods of time causes certain muscles in the body to lengthen and others to shorten. Specifically, hip flexors and chest muscles become short and tight, while glutes, back, neck and shoulder muscles become elongated and weak. Assuming this position day after day creates imbalances between tight and weak muscles.
    2. During exercise - muscles can tighten during physical activity, sometimes so intensely as to cramp. Muscle cramps usually arise due to dehydration or low levels of sodium or potassium.
    3. Following exercise - delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) occurs about 24-72 hours after unusually difficult physical activity. This condition is characterized by muscle soreness and tightness. Although uncomfortable, DOMS is actually your body’s healing response to micro-tears in the muscle fibers following intense exercise. The tight feeling following a hard workout is typically related to physical activity that shortens the muscle, such as pedaling a bike or certain weight-training movements like bicep curls. 

    Heat Therapy

    Much has been written about whether to use cold or heat therapy for aching and tight muscles. Studies show that cold therapy is better in the first 24 hours after a workout1. Heat is preferred after the initial healing period and for chronic pain. The reason is that cold is better at combating the early onset of inflammation, thereby potentially reducing recovery times and pain. The downside with ice is that it can tighten muscles. On the other hand, heat relaxes muscle tissues, which eases tightness and painful trigger points. Popular types of heat therapy that loosens tight muscles include:

    1. Heating pads -this method involves applying localized heat to a part of the body. If you are trying to figure out how to loosen tight muscles in the lower back, neck, arms or other specific areas of the body, a heating pad or gel pack will serve you well. Apply heat to the affected area for at least 15 minutes. 
    2. Soaking in warm water - by soaking in a bath or hot tub, you’ll enjoy full body heat rejuvenation. If you are looking for tips on how to loosen tight muscles in legs, soaking in warm water with salt should help. Epsom salts (magnesium sulfate) are a favorite way to soak among athletes and chronic pain sufferers, with many devotees claiming that the salts alleviate discomfort in muscles and joints. While there is no scientific data to show this, at the very least, soaking in warm water for at least 20 minutes will improve blood circulation and loosen tight muscles.
    3. Hit the sauna or steam room - much like soaking in warm water, getting into a sauna or steam room will provide heat therapy from head to toe. Besides relaxing tight muscles and relieving muscle cramps, full body heat therapy improves blood flow. This is essential to muscle recovery as oxygen is delivered to aching muscles and joints and muscle building byproducts are removed. 

    Stretching 

    If your muscles are short and tight, it makes sense that elongating them by stretching will help, right? While this is true, you need to be sure to stretch properly and safely. You can do more harm than good if you push yourself too hard or don’t take certain precautions. If you’re wondering how to loosen tight muscles in your arms, neck, or any other part of your body, try to stretch before and after every workout. Here are some guiding principles on how to loosen tight muscles in neck and other areas through stretching:

    1. Warm up - you want to use the elasticity of your muscles to your advantage while stretching, and your muscle fibers will be their most elastic when warmed up. To prepare yourself for stretching, try a light activity like walking. Active stretching can also work. This involves doing light movements that stretch muscles, like shoulder stretches, rotations, or the cat-cow position in yoga. You can also warm up with heat therapy. Consider stretching after you have soaked in the tub or enjoyed some time in the steam room.
    2. Go Light to Deep - while most of us know this, it bears saying: start off stretching lightly, and as your muscles become looser and you feel more comfortable, gradually go deeper into your stretches. If you feel tight, it is even more important to take it slow and listen to your body. Muscle tension, especially from working out, may mean you cannot go as deep into certain stretches as usual - and that’s okay!
    3. Stretch All Muscles in the Area - muscles move dynamically with adjacent muscles. Nearby muscles are also anatomically connected to each other, either by fascia, ligaments or tendons. As such, stretching should incorporate an entire part of the body, rather than a single muscle. For example, if your iliotibial (IT) band is tight, you will want to stretch nearby muscles, including glutes, hamstrings and quadriceps.

    Self-Myofascial Release & Deep Tissue Massage

    Your muscles are surrounded by sheaths of connective tissue called fascia. When fascia becomes restricted, often through repetitive movements, it causes knots and trigger points. As a result, connected muscles feel tense and tight. The idea behind a type of bodywork called myofascial release is to break up trigger points and release the fascia for improved mobility and reduced pain. 

    Another similar type of body work is deep tissue massage. As the name suggests, this massage technique focuses on applying pressure into the deeper layers of muscle. Much like other types of bodywork (including myofascial release), deep tissue massage enhances mobility, blood circulation, and comfort. The key difference is that more layers of muscle are affected during deep tissue massage.

    Performing self-massage regularly at home is critically important to alleviating muscle tension, muscular pain and keeping your body performing its best. The market is filled with self-massage tools that perform myofascial release, deep tissue massage, or a combination of the two. Here is a rundown of what to consider when choosing your self-massaging tool:

    1. Self-Myofascial Release Tools - the most well-known self-myofascial release tool is the foam roller. By rolling your body over the foam tube, muscles and fascia are condensed and released. Since foam rollers have long smooth sides, it is a tool best suited for myofascial release of large muscles. Other self-myofascial tools are better suited for releasing trigger points. These tools typically have smaller edges or sides that allow you to dig into specific areas of tension, such as around the shoulders. Most of these tools are not motorized, therefore requiring users to use their body weight against the tool to create tension, or manually press the tool into the body.
    2. Deep Tissue Massage Tools - there are some non-motorized self-myofascial tools that can perform deep tissue massage if enough pressure is applied. It is not always reliable and of course requires work on the user’s part. A more convenient and relaxing way to get a self-administered deep tissue massage is by using an electric massager. This is mostly because electric massagers can perform movements that penetrate deeper into muscle layers. In particular, massagers that make percussive movements apply concentrated and deep pulses of pressure. Keep in mind that some electric deep tissue massagers do not offer much in the way of myofascial release due to their intensity. If you want a massage tool that performs light and deep massage, consider massage gun with varying intensity levels.

    See a Professional Massage Therapist

    Regularly performing self-massage will do wonders in loosening tight muscles, but a massage therapist can take your recovery a step further.  Receiving a massage allows you to go into a deeper state of relaxation. Additionally, a professional massage therapist will have the skill to locate and manipulate tight muscles, trigger points and tense connective tissue that you cannot identify and treat on your own. 

    Talk to your massage therapist about what type of massage is appropriate for your level of muscle tightness and discomfort. If you are in the throes of serious muscle pain following a tough workout, you probably need a lighter massage. Deep tissue massage or sports massages are best reserved for athletes when their bodies are otherwise healthy, but in need of a therapeutic touch to the deeper layers of muscle. If you need a deeper form of therapy in order to heal a more serious injury, visit a physical therapist.

    Relaxing Tight Muscles for Mobility and Comfort

    With the right techniques and tools, you can quickly figure out how to fix tight muscles for improved mobility and comfort. Don’t forget to perform self-care techniques on muscles adjacent to the tight muscle. And since an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure, be sure to warm up and stretch properly before your next workout to help avoid tight muscles altogether. 

    Sources:

    1 Petrofsky, Jerrold S; Khowailed, Iman Akef; Lee, Haneul; Berk, Lee1; Bains, Gurinder S.; Akerkar, Siddhesh; Shah, Jinal; Al-Dabbak, Fuad; Laymon, Mike S. Cold Vs. Heat After Exercise—Is There a Clear Winner for Muscle Soreness. The Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research: November 2015 - Volume 29 - Issue 11 - p 3245–3252. https://journals.lww.com/nsca-jscr/Fulltext/2015/11000/Cold_Vs__Heat_After_Exercise_Is_There_a_Clear.33.aspx

  2. Discover the Compex® Wireless Mini

    Compex Wireless Mini EMS

    Help tackle your warm-ups, performance, and recovery with the palm of your hand.

    Introducing the newest addition to the Compex® lineup: The Compex® Wireless Mini. Portable, wireless, and smart, this muscle stim device connects to your smartphone so you can control programming and intensity with ease.

    [embed]https://youtu.be/PBPgm8PF2VI[/embed]

    What Makes the Compex® Wireless Mini So Unique?

    Delivering tiny electric pulses to the user’s skin through the electrodes, the Compex® Wireless Mini provides six programs of different pulse frequencies, helping cover Electrical Muscle Stimulation (EMS) and Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation (TENS).

    • Pre-Warm Up: Produces a muscle twitch. Runs at a low frequency and helps increase local blood flow, warming the muscle tissue, and increase reaction of the muscles prior to a workout or competition.
    • Endurance: Designed to help activate the aerobic metabolism muscle fibers during the session. The program helps to establish or improve basic muscle endurance and is designed to help increase the average intensity of muscle effort over that must be maintained over a long period of time.
    • Resistance: Designed to help activate the anaerobic metabolism of the muscle, as this program helps increase the time a muscle can maintain a higher work level. It is designed for sporting activities, which are characterized by a need for intense efforts to be maintained or repeated to help approach the limit of muscle exhaustion.
    • Active Recovery: Produces a muscle twitch at a low frequency. Helps increase local blood flow, leading to a faster reduction of lactic acid than mere rest, while promoting muscle relaxation which helps enable a faster recovery.
    • Muscle Relaxation: Produces a muscle twitch. Runs at the lowest frequency possible to help relax muscles that are fatigued after a workout or competition.
    • TENS: The TENS program is used to help temporarily alleviate localized pain.

    What Does the Compex® Wireless Mini App Offer? 

    The App on the phone pairs with the main device and can operate it via Bluetooth. Alternatively, the main device can control the Compex® device via the radio frequency. So, the App can control either the main device alone, and simultaneously operates the master device and the affiliation device.

    In the App, you’ll find six unique programs designed to help take your training to the next level, the Training Log to keep track of your progression, and a pad placement guide so you’ll know where to place the electrodes.

    What Makes the Compex® Wireless Mini Different?

    Unlike our other Compex® Devices, this EMS with TENS can be controlled from the main device or through the App. So, it’s a great alternative when traveling or at the gym.

    Whether you’re trying to increase strength and endurance or want to help manage pain, the Compex® Wireless Mini offers many benefits to help you reach your goals.

    Shop the Compex® Wireless Mini

    The contents of this blog were independently prepared, and are for informational purposes only. The opinions expressed herein are those of the author and are not necessarily indicative of the views of any other party. Individual results may vary depending on a variety of patient-specific attributes and related factors.

     

  3. How to Be Ready for The Open

    The Open Training

    So, you’re thinking about doing the Open. What’s stopping you from doing it?

    Five weeks of challenging workouts to test you both mentally and physically is not an easy feat. While many competitors will spend hours in the gym tiring themselves out daily and trying different training routines to improve their performance, you can do the same without spending hours in the gym or fatiguing your muscles. So, what’s the best way to be ready for the Open?

    Brooke Wells, CrossFit® and Compex® Athlete, understands the demands your body goes under when competing during the Open and provides a little insight to help you be ready for the grueling few weeks, “The biggest thing is to treat the Open as if it were a regular training day! Don’t do anything different like try a new crazy pre-workout or warm up extra, extra long. Stay in your typical routine, and don’t freak or stress out about it,” she adds, “Trust your training and go as hard as you can. Make sure you are recovered before, have a good meal, get sleep, and proper recovery—like using a Compex® device).”

    When Compex® electric muscle stimulation is added to your workouts, it helps maximize your muscular effort by engaging a greater percentage of muscle fibers. Compex® devices target both Type 1 slow twitch muscle fibers which impact endurance and Type 2 fast twitch muscle fibers which impact power and explosiveness. Using a Compex® EMS device can help take your performance to the next level. Here’s how to be ready for the Open with the assistance of one of our EMS devices.

    Dynamic Warm-ups

    Before you begin you the Open workout, it’s essential to warm up your muscles. Using our pre-designed programs can help make your time more efficient in the gym. A dynamic warm-up helps loosen muscles and gets them ready for rigorous activity, which may help to prevent injury during training or competition.

    The Performance™, Sport Elite™, and Wireless Muscle Stimulator™ all offer the Pre-Warm Up program which produces a muscle twitch and runs at a low frequency while increasing local blood flow, warming the muscle tissue, and helping to improve reaction of the muscles prior to a workout or competition.

    The Sport Elite™ and Wireless Muscle Stimulators™ offer Potentiation which is recommended before a workout or competition, especially for sports requiring speed and velocity. Applied briefly just before the beginning of a competition, it offers immediate, well-potentiated muscle fibers and helping to optimize performance.

    So, before you tackle the challenge, turn on the Dynamic Warm-up setting to get ready to compete.

    Quick Recovery

    One advantage that you’ll have if you use the EMS device is that you can help speed up your recovery before the next workout, whether you want to redo the week’s challenge or you’re ready to take on the next one at The Open.

    Compex® EMS devices offer multiple post-workout programs to assist in your recovery. The variety of recovery programs are designed to bring fresh oxygen and nutrients to the muscles to help flush lactic acid, aiding you to recover faster.

    After your workout, place the electrodes on the muscle area you'd like to target. Select your program and let Compex® help you get stronger and fitter faster than you would with your regular routine.

    The Edge™, Performance™, Sport Elite™ and Wireless Muscle Stimulator™ offer the Active Recovery program which increases local blood flow, leading to a faster reduction of lactic acid than mere rest, promotes muscle relaxation and helps enable faster recovery. These devices also offer TENS which can be used to temporarily alleviate localized pain.

    The Sport Elite™ and Wireless Muscle Stimulator™ devices offer Recovery Plus which runs at a lower frequency for inducing gentle muscle twitches, increasing local blood flow, generating endorphins (the body's natural analgesic) and promoting muscle relaxation when muscles are fatigued after a vigorous workout or competition. They also offer Massage, which runs at the lowest frequency possible to help relax muscles that are fatigued after a workout or competition.

    While other competitors may take breaks, stretch or try the workout before they take on the Open workouts, you can allow your body to rest while still helping your muscles improve and strengthen by using the warm-up and recovery programs. Good luck during the Open!

    Shop our Compex® Muscle Stimulators

    The contents of this blog were independently prepared, and are for informational purposes only. The opinions expressed herein are those of the author and are not necessarily indicative of the views of any other party. Individual results may vary depending on a variety of patient-specific attributes and related factors.

    CrossFit® is registered trademark of CrossFit®, Inc.

    Brooke Wells is a Compex® Sponsored Athlete.

     

  4. Cardio with Compex®

    The following recommendations for use with exercise equipment are for advanced users who have experience training with their Compex device and are comfortable with the sensations that it produces. Please make sure you have read the manual completely and understand the cautions and warnings of using this device.

    If you thought stationary bikes couldn’t get any worse, they can. Or, depending on how you look at it, better. Take your Assault Bike or Spin bike experience to a new level with the use of your wireless Compex device and help maximize your potential for competition time.

    To get cyclist quads, you have to train like a cyclist. To be a cyclist, you’ll have to be as tough as one, too. Applying your NMES device to your quads while spinning, sprinting and sucking air on an Airdyne® or Assault Bike will help increase leg strength by contracting the full potential of the muscle.

    Because of the often “violent” nature of the Assault Bike experience, using the Compex electrode wraps will help keep pods secure and avoid any distraction from the task. Stick on some pads, clip in, strap up and give one of these workouts a try!

    Endurance + Max Calories

    Spin your heart out on the Endurance program of your Compex device. But this is no ride in the park! Aim for max calories through the duration of the 55 minute program and give it all you’ve got. The Endurance program targets primarily Type 1 (slow-twitch) muscle fibers most often associated with long distance or duration conditioning.

    Resistance + Intervals

    The Resistance program fires both Type 1 and Type 2 muscle fibers to maximize the strength potential of the targeted muscle and will offer the most “bang for your buck” for some sprint intervals. During each contraction phase, hit a full effort sprint. These are short intervals, so there’s no holding back. Take a brief rest in the recovery phases. Your efforts will likely fall off after several sets, so start with a target of about 10-15 of these intervals. Once the “sprint” effect has worn off, conclude your workout. This is about the effort, not the duration!

    Conclude your workout with the Training Recovery (Also known as Active Recovery) program immediately post workout, admire your quad pump and buy yourself some new short shorts!

    Compex is registered trademark of DJO, LLC

    AirDyne is a registered trademark of AirDyne LTD

  5. Compex® Trusted for 30 Years + FDA Clear

    FDA Cleared

    Compex®, the muscle specialist, is always looking to support athletes in their quest for well-being, performance or even exceeding training objectives.

    As a global leader for more than 30 years in muscle stim technology, Compex® has dedicated hours and energy to make sure health care professionals, athletes, and individuals have the essential technology and support needed to help relieve muscle pain and improve strength. Our FDA-cleared products are beneficial for muscle recovery, injury prevention, pain management, and intense training programs. We offer the best in Electric Muscle Stimulators (EMS), Electrodes, and EMS Accessories.

    Electrostimulation

    Electrostimulation allows you to naturally reap the benefits of improved stamina, quick recovery, as well as increased blood circulation, strength, and muscle volume. It's a great complement to any existing sports training regimen. From seasoned professionals to weekend warriors, there are many benefits that can be found adding FDA-cleared Compex® muscle stim devices into any training regimen.

    Compex® Electric Muscle Stimulators

    The technology of Compex®, drawn from its double roots — Swiss quality and medical requirement — is light, portable and easy to use. Whether used for training and muscle strength or relaxation and pain relief, Compex® FDA-cleared EMS devices are an essential go-to training tool as a complement to or occasionally to replace voluntary physical activity.

    With many pre-designed program options, the Compex® FDA-cleared devices are meant to help athletes and active individuals reach their fullest potential, fast and effectively.

    FDA-Cleared

    FDA-cleared medical devices are ones that FDA has determined to be substantially equivalent to (similar) another legally marketed device. A premarket notification submission is referred to as a 510(k) and must be submitted to FDA to review and provide clearance.

    Shop for a Compex® Muscle Stimulator

    Individual results may vary. Neither DJO Global, Inc. nor any of its subsidiaries dispense medical advice. The contents of this blog do not constitute medical, legal, or any other type of professional advice. Rather, please consult your healthcare professional for information on the courses of treatment, if any, which may be appropriate for you.

     

  6. How Compex® Can Help Your IRONMAN Training

     

    Training for an IRONMAN?

    Whether this is your first or you’ve tackled many IRONMANS, you know that you’ll need to put heavier-than-usual loads on your body to meet your training plan.

    During training, you put a ton of stress on your body. All that amount of pressure can lead to injury before, during, or after race day. What can you do? Using electric muscle stimulation (EMS) and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) may be the final puzzle piece in your triathlon training plan to help you keep healthy for your IRONMAN and beyond the finish line.

    Why EMS and TENS?

    EMS and TENS is an essential part of IRONMAN training because it helps increase strength, endurance, stamina, and recovery, all of which help maximize performance.

    Lisa Bentley, 11-time IRONMAN Champion, coach, speaker and author of An Unlikely Champion says, “I have used TENS to reduce pain around a few different injuries—inflammation of tendons, lower-back tightness, and subsequent SI joint issues. I have used EMS to stimulate the muscles which often get turned off due to injury.”

    What are EMS and TENS?

    Basically, EMS mimics the way your body works to cause your muscles to contract. Your muscles act as if you’re working out. Except, instead of voluntarily firing off (because you, say, lift something), the muscles fire when given a very particular electrical impulse from your Compex® device. The TENS can help relieve muscle pain due to injury and over-training. The TENS setting on your Compex delivers small, safe, electrical signals through conductive pads to stimulate the nerves under your skin. It relieves pain in two ways: by helping the body to release natural painkillers (called endorphins) and by blocking pain messages.

    Using Compex® During Training

    Using Compex during your training can help you gain muscle strength in hard-to-reach areas and strengthen muscles when injured. “I had patellar femoral pain, I used EMS to stimulate the medial quadriceps muscle to get stronger and activated so that it could help hold my knee cap in place and counteract my overactive ITB from pulling my kneecap to the outside,” explains Bentley. “I had used EMS when I had a stress fracture to keep the surrounding muscles activated while we rested the bone and joint as they repaired. That way, when the bone was healed, I was able to return to training faster since the normal muscular atrophy had been reduced or eliminated.”

    Compex for Recovery

    Also, Compex can also activate muscles on recovery days to enhance blow flow, which in turn helps heal your body. “Training is the process of stressing out muscles and breaking them down. Improvements come during the recovery phase where the muscle gets stronger and more resilient,” shares Bentley.

    Ironically, injuries happen when you overload muscles and tendons. Recovery from injury occurs when you gradually introduce load to the muscle or tendons. You cannot have rehabilitation without introducing a controlled load. Adding in your Compex device to your training allows for that controlled load by stimulating the muscles.

    Compex for Warming Up

    On top of strength and recovery, you can use your Compex for an effective warm up. The pre-designed programs can target the specific muscle groups you’ll be using, whether you’re in the locker room, at your desk, or sitting next to the pool. The great thing about using Compex during your IRONMAN training is that it’s portable so you can multitask and warm up as you make your way to the pool or set up your bike for a ride. And, it reaches muscle groups that are hard to reach from a regular warm-up.

    Supplemental Tool

    Compex is a tool to supplement strength and endurance programs. You can use the conditioning pre-designed programs to supplement weight training on the same day. Say you focus on training legs one morning, you can use EMS strength on the same muscles that evening, and follow up with active recovery. This helps to fire up your muscles a little quicker than training alone.

    You’re putting in a lot of hard work for your IRONMAN. You want to wake up feeling refresh and ready to train each day. In addition to your plan, make sure you get proper sleep, eat well, and use your Compex for an all-around solid training routine.

    Shop for a Compex Device

    The contents of this blog were independently prepared, and are for informational purposes only. The opinions expressed herein are those of the author and are not necessarily indicative of the views of any other party. Individual results may vary depending on a variety of patient-specific attributes and related factors.

  7. Tuesday Tip - Training Recovery Program

    Today's tip is all about how to use your Compex Training Recovery Program

  8. How to Recover for Better Triathlon Training

     

    Let’s face it. Training for a triathlon is a huge time commitment. And if you want to get better, you’ve got to put in the work. But, what if we were to tell you that you don't need to add longer, harder workouts to be a stronger triathlete.

    What’s the key to better triathlon training? Recovery.

    Depending on your fitness level will determine the number of training weeks you’ll need to cross the finish line strong, and safely. But to train your best, you need to make sure you give your body optimal recovery between workouts.

    Whether your goal is to set a new PR or finish the race, here’s how to recover for better triathlon training.

    Set Your Recovery Day

    No matter what triathlon training schedule you use, you should set one day as a full recovery day. A recovery day can be partaking in a yoga class, going for a long walk, taking a hike, using your Compex® device, or even indulging in a sports massage. You’re giving your body a break from the intense training, which you need to prevent overworking your muscles. So, choose one day a week as your recovery day, and stick to it. Your body will be happy, and you’ll gain more strength during training.

    Foam Roll Post-Training

    Also known as self-myofascial release (SMR), foam rolling is designed to work out the knots (also called trigger points) in your muscles. Myofascial adhesions can develop through stress, training, overuse, underuse, movement imbalances, and injuries. Mainly, the knots are points of constant tension and addressing them can have a positive effect on your workouts. Ignoring them can lead to muscle fatigue and may cause injury.

    While foam rolling can be uncomfortable, you control the pressure, and over time, you’ll be able to release the pain and relax the muscle. Tension can be released from the affected area, increasing blood flow and nutrients to the muscle tissue, and improving range of motion (ROM) for a more effective triathlon training program.

    Ice Your Muscles

    Got a sore muscle or slight inflammation? Ice therapy (cold therapy) can help a minor muscle-related injury because it can help reduce swelling and improve blood flow to the affected tissue. According to one Harvard Health study, applying ice to the sore area for 10 to 15 minutes is one of the cheapest, simplest, and a most effective way to manage swelling.

    Shop our HyperIce®or ColPac® collections for ice recovery.

    Use Your Compex® Device

    Electric muscle stimulation trains your muscles in a way that traditional workouts alone cannot. While you can use your Compex® device before or during your workouts, the recovery mode helps activate the muscle to contract based on the amount of resistance applied through the device. You can also use the TENS program, which helps to alleviate pain by either inducing an endorphin release (Low-Frequency TENS programs) or to block the pain signals to the brain through the Gate Theory (High-Frequency TENS programs). Regardless if you use EMS or TENS, your Compex device can help flush lactic acid, replenish muscles with nutrient, and get your body ready for the next workout.

    Learn more on EMS and TENS.

    Whether you’re looking to compete in a sprint triathlon or an IRONMAN, one of the most effective ways to train is to focus on your recovery, so your body is healthy, strong, and ready to compete.

    The contents of this blog were independently prepared, and are for informational purposes only. The opinions expressed herein are those of the author and are not necessarily indicative of the views of any other party. Individual results may vary depending on a variety of patient-specific attributes and related factors.

    HyperIce® is a registered trademark of HyperIce, Inc.

    Shop for your Compex® device.

  9. Compex Wraps + TENS

    TENS Wraps / Heat The Compex lineup offers the best of training and recovery to athletes and gym rats and with the newest options of the TENS add-on, users can treat pain, too. Whether injury is acute or chronic, the use of of a TENS device can help to inhibit the experience of pain by targeting the sensory nervous system. With new knee and back wraps from Compex, pain management is even easier for common target areas by combining compression, heat TENS, and NMES all in one simple package!

     

    Compex Wraps

    With the new Compex wraps, targeting bodily pain becomes easier and puts treatment into the hands of individuals. With specially designed wraps for both the low back and knee, users that suffer from injuries to these common areas can seek relief. The anatomical fit of the Compex wraps maximizes the efficiency of the TENS device and eliminates the need for electrodes while also providing compression. No cords and sticky pads to worry about! These wraps also have two levels of heat control to increase blood flow to the affected area. The wireless device fitted to the Compex wraps feature an easy-to-use touch screen to choose the program, intensity level, and control heat functions. Portable and lightweight, it’s an easy add-in to your gym bag or travel pack when on the go!

    What’s the Difference? TENS vs NMES

    Though both TENS and NMES may appear similar, the use of either device serve very different purposes. An NMES device targets muscle fibers, exciting muscle tissue much like regular exercise would. This stimulation allows muscle growth and can aid in recovery from training by bringing blood flow back to sore or damaged tissue. On the other hand, a TENS device targets the sensory nerves, inhibiting the reception of the “pain signal” to the brain. This function “tricks” the mind into ignoring pain for a period of time and is also believed to release endorphins that further aid in shutting off pain. Sufferers of bulging discs or even arthritis often benefit greatly from the use of TENS.

    More effective and usable than ever, Compex’s most recent expanses offer considerable benefit to both training, recovery and re-cooperation. Gone are the days of relying solely on therapists for relieving pain and treating injury - it can happen right from your gym bag, right where you are!

  10. Tuesday Tip - Endurance Program

    Today's tip is all about understanding how to use the Endurance Programs on your Compex device.

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