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Why is recovery from walking important?

We get it. “Recovery from walking?” You may ask cynically. Why would we need to recover from walking? It’s a basic fundamental activity we do everyday, if we are able-bodied.

We understand. Which is what brings us to our point: Recovery is necessary for anyone that breathes. Anyone who is moving their body is using their muscles - be it at high intensity or a slug’s pace, depending upon the person and activity level. When we use our muscles, they naturally break down. The fibers get stress put upon them, and eventually come to a point of fatiguing. Our bodies are able to go on for a long time without experiencing the detrimental effects of the stress impacted upon us with everyday movement… but there will come a point where change needs to be made. Either an individual changes their main activity of choice for a time, or they break (be it fatiguing, a stress fracture, breaking a bone etc), or they opt to intentionally recover.

We’ll let you decide which side of the street you want to fall into. Or walk on.

Now, to start off with why walking is even beneficial, in the first place.

Compex Electrostimulation Training Program for Walking

Offseason / Preseason Prep Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday
Week 1
Week 1
(static)
[Resistance]
Quads and Calves
[Resistance]
Shoulders and Deltoids
[Resistance]
Forearms
[Resistance]
Quads and Calves
[Resistance]
Shoulders and Deltoids
[Resistance]
Forearms
 
Recovery
Recovery
[Pre warm up or training recovery]
minimum 6 minutes
[Pre warm up or training recovery]
minimum 6 minutes
[Pre warm up or training recovery]
minimum 6 minutes
[Pre warm up or training recovery]
minimum 6 minutes
[Pre warm up or training recovery]
minimum 6 minutes
[Pre warm up or training recovery]
minimum 6 minutes
[Pre warm up or training recovery]
minimum 6 minutes
Week 2
Week 2
(static)
[Resistance]
Quads and Calves
[Resistance]
Shoulders and Deltoids
[Resistance]
Forearms
[Resistance]
Quads and Calves
[Resistance]
Shoulders and Deltoids
[Resistance]
Forearms
 
Recovery
Recovery
[Pre warm up or training recovery]
minimum 6 minutes
[Pre warm up or training recovery]
minimum 6 minutes
[Pre warm up or training recovery]
minimum 6 minutes
[Pre warm up or training recovery]
minimum 6 minutes
[Pre warm up or training recovery]
minimum 6 minutes
[Pre warm up or training recovery]
minimum 6 minutes
[Pre warm up or training recovery]
minimum 6 minutes
Week 3
Week 3
(add dynamic based on how body feels)
[Resistance]
Quads and Calves
[Resistance]
Shoulders and Deltoids
[Resistance]
Forearms
[Resistance]
Quads and Calves
[Resistance]
Shoulders and Deltoids
[Resistance]
Forearms
 
Recovery
Recovery
[Pre warm up or training recovery]
minimum 6 minutes
[Pre warm up or training recovery]
minimum 6 minutes
[Pre warm up or training recovery]
minimum 6 minutes
[Pre warm up or training recovery]
minimum 6 minutes
[Pre warm up or training recovery]
minimum 6 minutes
[Pre warm up or training recovery]
minimum 6 minutes
[Pre warm up or training recovery]
minimum 6 minutes
Week 4
Week 4
(add dynamic based on how body feels)
[Resistance]
Quads and Calves
[Resistance]
Shoulders and Deltoids
[Resistance]
Forearms
[Resistance]
Quads and Calves
[Resistance]
Shoulders and Deltoids
[Resistance]
Forearms
 
Recovery
Recovery
[Pre warm up or training recovery]
minimum 6 minutes
[Pre warm up or training recovery]
minimum 6 minutes
[Pre warm up or training recovery]
minimum 6 minutes
[Pre warm up or training recovery]
minimum 6 minutes
[Pre warm up or training recovery]
minimum 6 minutes
[Pre warm up or training recovery]
minimum 6 minutes
[Pre warm up or training recovery]
minimum 6 minutes
Week 5
Week 5
(add dynamic based on how body feels)
[Resistance]
Quads and Calves
[Resistance]
Shoulders and Deltoids
[Resistance]
Forearms
[Resistance]
Quads and Calves
[Resistance]
Shoulders and Deltoids
[Resistance]
Forearms
 
Recovery
Recovery
[Pre warm up or training recovery]
minimum 6 minutes
[Pre warm up or training recovery]
minimum 6 minutes
[Pre warm up or training recovery]
minimum 6 minutes
[Pre warm up or training recovery]
minimum 6 minutes
[Pre warm up or training recovery]
minimum 6 minutes
[Pre warm up or training recovery]
minimum 6 minutes
[Pre warm up or training recovery]
minimum 6 minutes
Tips on how to use our walking training program
  • The above plan is a recommendation, but the overall goal is to use the resistance program on each muscle group twice a week.
  • Static means you are stationary in a comfortable position.
  • Dynamic work (body squats or calf raises) should only be done during the season.
  • Remain standing whenever using the resistance program on your calves.
  • During your workouts should be the full workout period of 12 minutes.
  • The plan above is meant for season prep, however, if you continue your workouts in season the recommendation is still 2 times a week per muscle group, but instead of the full 12 minute workout, aim for 8 minutes or less depending on how your body feels.


Walking training on dirth path

What are the benefits of walking as we age?

While it may seem obvious that walking is necessary for everyday activities, it actually serves a number of other beneficial purposes. Whether you need reasons to continue walking or not, check out just how many ways walking supports our overall longevity and physical wellness.

Strengthen Bones

Walking can slow the loss of bone mass for people with osteoporosis, according to Michael A. Schwartz, MD, of Plancher Orthopedics & Sports Medicine in New York. A study of post-menopausal women found that 30 minutes of daily walking decreased their risk of hip fractures by 40%.

Promote Longevity

Research shows that people who are active regularly in their fifties and sixties are 35% less likely to die over the next eight years than people who are not physically active their age. For individuals with underlying health conditions, that number increases to 45% less likely.

Reduce the Rate
of Mental Decline

A study by the University of California, San Francisco took data on 6,000 women ages 65 and older - to find that age-related memory decline slowed down in the women who walked more. The study revealed that women who walked 2.5 miles daily had a 17% decline in memory, compared to a 25% decline in women who walked less than a half-mile weekly.

Increase Muscle Strength

Though not regularly correlated with impressive muscle growth, walking does in fact strengthen leg muscles, as well as core muscles. Think about activating your glutes, quads, and hamstrings as you walk, and just see if you notice a difference over time.

Lose Weight

To put it simply: Walking for 30 minutes at a brisk pace burns 200 calories. Over time, burning calories, combined with other lifestyle choices, can lead to losing weight.

Improve Sleep

Studies show that women ages 50 to 75 who take 60-minute morning walks are less likely to have insomnia than women who do not walk.

Fuel Your Joints

The majority of our joint cartilage does not have a direct supply of blood. Joint cartilage is fueled by joint fluid that circulates as we move our bodies. Movement and compression from walking adjusts the position of the cartilage, introducing oxygen and nutrients to the hungry area.

Reduce Risk of Alzheimer's

The University of Virginia Health System in Charlottesville conducted a study on men ages of 71 and 93. They found that those who walked more than a quarter of a mile daily experienced half of the dementia and Alzheimer’s disease than the men who walked less.

Brighten Your Mood

In addition to physical benefits in the long term, walking also supports emotional benefits in the short term. It naturally releases endorphins to the body. A study by California State University, Long Beach, found that people with higher step counts during the day correlated with experiencing improved moods.

Walking using muscle stimulator to recover on the couch

What does recovery
from walking do?

You may already fully acknowledge that maintaining your physical ability to walk is important, but have you considered the various ways that walking is working toward your wellbeing? Not only does it engage the quadriceps and hamstrings, but it also targets the gluteal muscles and calves. All of these muscles working together can help build muscular strength as well as endurance.

So while it may not seem necessary to recover from walking, the more we know, the more equipped we can be for long-term wellness. Once we know how involved and engaging walking truly is for our physicality, we can begin to grasp the importance of recovery. To promote your best lifelong longevity, making an intentional point to recover on a regular basis truly will make a difference over time. Which leads us to the question: What is the recommended way to recover from walking? We’re glad you asked.

Walking training on dirth path

How does using Compex
help my recovery?

The Compex muscle stimulator device is powered by electrical impulses to activate your muscles, which promotes a number of beneficial impacts on your body. First, the stimulation builds up muscle strength. When you use a Compex device, you can target particular muscles to activate them quicker. On the recovery side, this gives you the opportunity to target specific areas to flush out to recover. This also promotes blood flow, as the electrical impulses move up and down through the muscles, essentially moving the bloodstream along with it. Ridding the body of lactic acid and toxins that would otherwise remain stagnant for too long, causing soreness and fatigue. This blood movement also contributes to speeding up recovery. As you apply stimulation from Compex, you can reduce tightness in muscles while improving flexibility.

In order to use Compex, place the tabs on your quads, which will activate slow twitch muscle fibers that will increase your endurance, as well as support your recovery. Next, placing the tabs on your hamstrings will play a large role in leveling out your muscle groups - since oftentimes, people can tend to activate their quads instead of their hamstrings. Using the Compex stimulation gives your hamstrings a chance to wake up, so they can do their part in both walking and recovery.

Walker using muscle stimulator sitting on the couch

How does Compex
support longevity?

If you decide to try using Compex for your personal everyday recovery from walking, you will likely notice, over time, less muscle fatigue and soreness. By using Compex, you get to be proactive in stimulating specific muscle groups, which ensures a complete approach to your recovery - and in turn, your recovery.

Aging - be it in our early adulthood with regular high-intensity activity, or in our later years as we may slow down but still strive to challenge ourselves physically - does not have to mean growing weaker. While choosing to be intentional in our recovery may not always feel like a walk in the park, you will likely reap the benefits if you do choose to implement recovery. Which, eventually, will feel like a walk in the park.