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Compex Meets

  1. Preparing for your first Triathlon

    Jeremy Leroux is a French triathlete and influencer. He has been in the sport since 2016, originally coming from the running world. Once a friend lent him a bike for a little while, he fell in love and thought "why not give this thing a go?". Today he is looking at Ironman distances and hopes to be on the starting mat as soon as possible.

    Today with Jeremy, we break down how to get ready for your first triathlon. Getting started, investing in the right equipment, training splits and race day prep… we will cover it all and hopefully you’ll learn some helpful tips.

     

    Jeremy Leroux Cycling

     

    1 – BREAKING DOWN TRAINING AND NUTRITION

    Compex: How many times do you train per week during race prep, and how do you split it between the three disciplines?

    Jeremy: 15 to 20 hours, I try to bike 3 to 4 times per week, and about the same for running and swimming.

    Compex: For someone who is looking to get started in triathlon, would you advise hiring a coach? Joining a group? Or simply figure it out on your own?

    Jeremy: I think it depends on people. If it is your first one and the goal is just to have fun, asking advice around you can be enough. Read, document yourself and look at what others maybe doing. However, if your goal is to get better in the sport, joining a team is great because you have a coach and teammates. Your trainings are well put-together, and your teammates push you to perform every day. This is the optimal choice for long term.

    Compex: When you start training for your first triathlon, should you focus on one discipline more than the two others? Or should you equally share time between the three?

    Jeremy: I think that you should always train all three of them equally, unless you feel very weak in one of the three disciplines. It is always better to train your weaknesses more than your strengths. However, there is no shortcut. Training, regularity and patience will be your keys to success.

    Compex: Often people get overly excited when starting a new sport, which is understandable. How important would you say it is to not over-train and add rest days to your week of training?

    Jeremy: Your body needs to recover. Having a coach is better because he or she will plan your recovery times. If you don’t have one, listen carefully to your body and what messages it is sending you. I know you’ll want to do more and more, but this is the best way to put too much stress on your body and run out of gas, or worst, get injured.

    Compex: Should you train transitions between disciplines?

    Jeremy: Of course, there are specific sessions where your focus is on the transition, going from the swim to the bike, or from the bike to the run. I would say at least once a week, on shorter distances, but with a race day intensity!

    Compex: In a sport where you need plenty of calories for those long efforts, how important would you say your nutrition is?

    Jeremy: Of course, it is very important to stay on track with your nutrition. You need to fuel your body correctly in order to perform well during your training sessions. Make sure you have some cheat days occasionally though; it is good for the body and for the mind (laugh).

    2 – INVESTING IN THE RIGHT EQUIPMENT

    Compex: Where would you say we should start looking when getting ready for our first triathlon, and how much are we looking at in terms of investment?

    Jeremy: Since it’s the first and you don’t know if you’ll keep doing it after your race is over, maybe do not invest in the most expensive stuff. Get a good road bike that you are comfortable with (this is where you’ll spend the most time probably). Then look for a good swimsuit for open water, and maybe a couple of accessories for pool sessions in order to work on technique. Lastly, find a good pair of shoes for your running, and your set! As you get better, it will get more expensive for sure, but to start, you don’t need all the bells and whistles.

     

    Jeremy Leroux Swimming

     

    3 – STEPS TO YOUR FIRST TRIATHLON

    Compex: In your preparation, do you think there is any interest in partaking in shorter distances to test yourself, like a local 10km, a swim-run etc?

    Jeremy: If you’ve done your training right, I don’t think that is necessary unless you are training for an Ironman, in which case it might be useful to train or shorter distances like a half marathon. In the case of a first race, I would say maybe do your own mini triathlon to train transitions and race day paces. You’ll be fine!

    4 – GETTING SET ON RACE DAY

    Compex: Morning comes, and the stress is there. Any tips you could give us to embrace the race day jitters?

    Jeremy: That is completely normal! Even if you are just doing it for fun, you’ll feel the stress for sure. Embrace it. You’ve done the training, you’ve put in the work, so stay focused and have some positive thoughts. Breathing can really help with stress as well, so make sure you are calm and relaxed. Something that might help take some stress off your shoulders is making a race day checklist. I always do that, so I don’t panic if I forget to bring something with me to the race.

    Compex: What is your go-to race day breakfast?

    Jeremy: I highly recommend not changing your breakfast habits. Changes are the best way to stress out more. Stay in your routine. For me it’s oats and nuts with Greek yogurt, some fruit and dried fruit, and coffee of course. For an Ironman, I like adding some rice for digestion purposes throughout the race.

    Compex: Since we are talking about very long efforts, how do you manage eating throughout the race?

    Jeremy: I usually know at which point in the race I’m taking my little gels or bars. I also make sure I drink about every 10 minutes on the bike. It is very important to have a plan, so you don’t run out of energy at some point, and so you don’t eat too much at once.

    Compex: Do you warm up for the swim part the morning of the race?

    Jeremy: For sure, I always warm up for the swim if possible. If not, I’ll use resistance bands to wake up the muscles, massage stiff areas with my Fixx 1.0 and maybe even use the warmup program of my Compex to make sure I am ready to go.

    Compex: What is the most important thing to focus on before your race?

    Jeremy: There is not one particular thing. Stay focused and don’t forget to enjoy the experience. You’ll probably remember your first triathlon forever, so soak it in while you can!

     

    And there you have it! Tips, tricks and motivation for your first triathlon. Let us know if you’ve used any or if you found any of them particularly useful. Compex is looking forward to hearing about your first triathlon story!

  2. Debunking 9 Nutrition Stereotypes with Maelys Lafrogne

    Maelys (24) is a French osteopath, influencer, & fitness advisor, who always loved to learn about nutrition. She has studied it so much that she wrote some eBooks with healthy diet option, to keep having pleasure eating whilst still matching your fitness goals. Her latest one called “Life Is Sweet” has some great recepies if you are a sweet-tooth person who wants to stay in shape but still enjoy desert.

     

    Maelys LaFrogne

     

    Today we will go down the list of 9 famous stereotypes about nutrition with Maelys. Let’s eat some knowledge together!

    Stereotype #1: Avoiding carbs to lose weight.

    Maelys: “This one is very easy to understand, because it is all about balance. If you eat more calories than you burn, you’ll likely gain weight. However, if you burn more calories than you eat, you’ll most likely lose weight. You’ll maintain if you burn as much as you consume.

    Now, you can eat 2.000 calories of burgers, if it is your maintenance intake, you will not gain or lose weight (we do not advise that obviously). Your carbs are on the nutrients chart and, such as protein, fats and others, they are not responsible for gaining or losing weight. Calories are.”

    Stereotype #2: Training on an empty stomach is better for weight loss.

    Maelys: “It is not optimal. Going for a training session on an empty stomach will have your body use muscle resources, which is more likely to degrade muscles. This is often counter-productive for the body. I suggest eating a little bit of carbs and a little bit of protein about an hour before training. Give your body a little bit of fuel, you’ll need it.”

     

    Tasty Food

     

    Stereotype #3: Fresh-fruit juice equals eating a fresh fruit.

    Maelys: “This is not true for two reasons. Drinking juice means that the fibers inside the fruit have been broken. You’ll end up having less nutrients and losing lots of the benefits of fibers.
    Another simple thing to consider is the quantity of fruit that you need to make a juice. You’ll probably need 5 oranges to make a glass of orange juice, and that means a skewed energy balance in the end.”

    Stereotype #4: Whey protein powder is considered Performance Enhancing Drugs (PEDs).

    Maelys: “This one is very simple. Protein powder is not a drug simply because they are found everywhere (chicken, eggs etc.). They are only a time-saver when it comes to consuming protein after training for example, instead of bringing your chicken breast when you are not that hungry post-workout.
    However, they should never replace all your meals! You should get the majority of your protein from whole food and leave the powders post-training.”

    Stereotype #5: Vegan protein is better nutrition than regular protein.

    Maelys: “There is a big misconception about vegan things being always absolutely better for the body since they are technically better for the environment. There are lots of anti-nutrients in vegan protein, which prevent the body from assimilating all the nutrients in food.
    I am not saying that being vegan is bad and you shouldn’t, but that just doesn’t make vegan protein better than regular protein. Keep an eye on your macro-nutrients if you are vegan, in order to avoid deficiencies.

    Stereotype #6: Eggs are bad nutrition for cholesterol levels.

    Maelys: “You have organs in your body that are made to work. If you bring too much cholesterol into your body, it will lower cholesterol synthesis. On the other hand, if you do not bring enough to your body, it will produce more itself. The body levels your cholesterol very well, and it does not matter if you eat 1, 2, 3 or 6 eggs per day.
    However, if you already have a cholesterol problem, this is where you should be careful with your diet. Otherwise, you are all good.”

    Stereotype #7: Do not eat after 6pm if you are trying to lose weight.

    Maelys: “About 90% of people workout after work, so usually around 5 to 8pm. In order to recover well, you need food and sleep. If you train late but then you do not eat because you heard it is bad after 6pm, you are not optimizing recovery. And if you do not train late, it is still a question of energy balance. Eating the number of calories that your body need in order to match your goals is really what matters when talking about losing weight.
    If you train late and do not feel like eating a full solid meal afterwards, you can substitute that with a rich protein drink like a smoothie. However, I really do not recommend going to bed with an empty stomach especially after training. You won’t sleep well, and your body will have a rough time recovering.”

    Stereotype #8: White meat is healthier nutrition than red meat.

    Maelys: “Technically, yes. White meat is very healthy, but red meat has such great features for the body. I would advise eating roughly 750g of red meat per week top. There are great things from red meat that your body needs, but it is not the best source and that is why you shouldn’t eat more than about 750g per week.”

    Stereotype #9: Energy drinks are great for performance.

    Maelys: “I really don’t recommend energy drinks for performance. I don’t think they are optimal. Sure, they have caffeine and energy components, and sure you might feel pumped before training. However, you are mostly paying the brand (usually expensive) for something that is not necessary.
    If you really need a pre-workout boost, I recommend making your own at home. Coffee is great, adding a little bit of salt in your water also for a great pump, but let’s be honest… your motivation is the best pre-workout there is, and should fuel you better than any energy drink on the market.

  3. Fitness & Nutrition during Pregnancy

    Ariane Brodier Ariane Brodier | Compex Fit 5.0

     

    Ariane Brodier is a French actress and author, very active on her social media. She has two beautiful toddlers (3 and 1) and loves talking about her mum life. More than 600k people follow her daily routine on Instagram.
    She has always been active her entire life. Before her first pregnancy, she was into martial arts and fitness, working out about 2 to 3 hours every other day, with some running in between. Ariane is what you can call an active mum!

    1 – ADAPTATIONS DURING PREGNANCY

    Even if you are a fitness freak and you love to train every day, pregnancy will slow you down. That is completely normal, and you should not stress about it. But how do you adapt your workouts to still get a good session in?

    ARIANE – First of all you should know that some sports should be avoided during pregnancy. Anything with an impact can have negative effects on your child, such as running or jumping. However, if you love cardio, you can still get your heart rate up without jumping, with an elliptical machine for example. We hear too often that you should not train during pregnancy and this is not true! Staying active will do wonders to your body when you are pregnant. Obviously, you are not pushing your limits at this stage of your life and you should not strive for performance.
    If you want to stay active during pregnancy, make sure that you are doing it the right way. Stay close to your doctor during this period of your life, they will give you the best advice to continue your fitness journey while pregnant.

    Were you able to stay motivated the whole time, even with all the changes that your body went through?

    ARIANE – You know, when sport is something that you enjoy, I don’t think it is that hard to stay active. You should see training as a fun moment for you. However, if you do not feel like training at the gym or doing your regular workouts, how about trying new sports? For me, it was the opportunity to get into swimming for example. It was a new workout and made me feel very good. That is why I encourage you to use this period of your life to try new things that you might love in the long run.

    Your body changes during pregnancy, and you cannot do anything about it. Was there a turning point where you realized “I have to accept that my body changes”?

    ARIANE – It is a little scary at first as this is something you are not really in control of. But being pregnant is such a magical experience that you quickly accept how your body changes. Enjoying this experience of becoming a mother is so much more important than losing your abs for a couple of years. No matter what, your body will be different after you have your child, the sooner you accept that, the better you will go through the changes.

    As a fitness enthusiast you probably had some sort of understanding of how nutrition works and made sure that what you ate was on par with your goals and your fitness routine. How did that change during your pregnancy, and how did you make sure you did not gain too much weight?

    ARIANE – You know, working out is never the hard part in a fitness routine, nutrition is! 70% of your progress is made through nutrition. The one thing you should absolutely be careful with is refined sugar. Whether you are pregnant or not it is not good for you, but in a case of a pregnancy, you should especially avoid it. Other than that, do not stress about it to much. Make sure that what you eat is the best quality possible, have some healthy fats along the way for the growth of the baby, and always remember that the health of your child will partially reflect how you ate during your pregnancy.

     

    2 – GETTING BACK AT IT AFTER THE BIRTH

    First thing first, when were you able to exercise again after giving birth?

    ARIANE – Before you go back to your running and your jumping and the rest of your workouts, it is detrimental that you go through perineum rehabilitation. This can last 1 to 2 months depending on how your pregnancy went. During that time, I went back to my best friend the elliptical.
    I also made good use of my Compex after I went through perineum rehab. It is a fantastic accelerator and it helps you tone your abs faster. It works your muscles deeper than with a simple abs workout, it is convenient, and you see results quickly after giving birth.

    Ariane Brodier | Compex Fit 5.Abs0 Ariane Brodier | Compex Fit 5.0

     

    Every mum in the world knows that having a child is a full-time job. How do you deal with things like lack of sleep, being interrupted in your workout etc.?

    ARIANE – My favorite thing now is the well known “Morning Routine”. I like to work out first thing in the morning, before breakfast, it works well for me. This is because I used to be very tired throughout the day and even if my kids were asleep. I had some time for me, I could not find the motivation to train. Getting up early and committing to working out was my only way to make it work. It was like “ok, now it is 5:30am and you are awake. Let’s make the most of the next hour, because you know you will not do it later in the day”.
    I would also like to point out that you can use this opportunity to try out new sports again. Do not stress about a routine, as having children and a routine are usually things that do not go together (laughs). Be ready to adapt and things will go well.

    Were you able to quickly go back to your eating habits or did you face any challenges?

    ARIANE – Breastfeeding will not let you go back to normal: it makes you SO hungry! Your body needs fat to produce milk, and you will want to eat a lot, all the time. But the way the body works this out is incredible. Keep eating healthy, stay away from refined sugar and everything will be alright.
    It depends on people, but having someone to guide you through this period of your life can be beneficial. We often think we are doing things right, but having an external person overlooking can help you with the choices you make daily.

    Let’s end on a positive note here and talk about how you perceive your body after giving birth. Your body has changed and even if there are things you can do, you said that it is necessary to accept that you will not go back to 100% what you looked like before. And that is fine! Are there any tips you can give to young mothers to help go through that process of “accepting who you are now”?

    ARIANE – When you become a mother, your focus shifts from “yourself” to “your kids”. You lose some of that “care” that you only had for your own body before. It can be harder for some mothers as the changes we go through can be very different from one woman to another. But becoming a mum is a whole new status and that is the most important thing to remember.
    I love the “I am who I am movement” these days. It's a movement that highlights the fact that no matter what you look like, how much you weigh. As long as you are doing everything to becoming the best version of yourself, you are on the right track and you should be proud of yourself! Find things to challenge you daily and always enjoy the process. The smile of your children will always be more valuable than the best set of abs.

  4. Compex Meets... Ray Zahab

    Ray Zahab - Canadian Explorer

     

    Compex: Hi there Ray, great to meet up with you - please tell us a little bit about yourself?

    Ray: Hey Compex! I’m a Canadian Explorer, ultra distance runner and Founder of non-profit impossible2Possible. I truly think we underestimate what we are capable of! A former pack a day smoker, I discovered adventure, and it turned my life around completely. I’m a recent recipient of the Meritorious Service Cross of Canada, and an Explorer in Residence of the Royal Canadian Geographical Society, and Fellow of the Royal Geographical Society. To this point, I have ran 17,000+km across the world’s deserts, and unsupported expeditions in some of the coldest places on the planet. You can read more about my story on my website.

    Compex: What sport do you do and how did you get into it?

    Ray: I guess you could say I am an ultra distance runner, but I started out as a sedentary smoker who, through the inspiration of my younger brother, discovered the outdoors. Shortly after that I began ice climbing, mountain bike and adventure racing, and eventually ultra running. My first running race was the 2004 Yukon Arctic Ultra, which I won. In 2006-7, I ran 7,500km across the Sahara Desert with two buddies of mine. The expedition had us running an average of 70kms a day without a single day of rest, for 111 days. National Geographic tracked the expedition by web, as well as the documentary film ‘Running The Sahara’, produced by Matt Damon and directed by Academy Award winner James Moll, was created in an effort to raise awareness for the drinking water crisis in North Africa.

     

    Ray Zahab - Canadian Explorer

     

    Compex: How does Compex Muscle Stim help you to find a competitive edge?

    Ray: I am 51 years old, but honestly, I recover better and I am faster then I was at 35. I'm now often racing and sometimes winning ultra endurance events. I credit much of this to recovery, and functional strength training. When I discovered Compex, it changed EVERYTHING for me. And in preparation for expeditions, I use my Compex during strength sessions- especially core workouts- which I have found dramatically improves workouts. On the recovery end - my Compex gets TONS of use. I have even brought it on expeditions like my 1,850km crossing of the Namib Desert in summer. Every night, in my tent, I’d put the Compex on my legs for recovery. It works, amazingly. Period.

    Compex: Which program/s do you like to use?

    Ray: Mostly Strength, all recovery and massage modes, and Pain Management modes.

    Compex: Do you use other Compex products?

    Ray: Yes! I use the Fixx, and now I love that too!

  5. Compex Meets... Christos Volikakis

    Christos Volikakis

     

    Compex: Hi there Christos, great to meet up with you - please tell us a little bit about yourself?

    Christos: Hello to all Compex fans! My name is Christos Volikakis. I live in Greece, I am an Elite Track Cyclist and a proud affiliated athlete of the Compex Greece Team.

     

    Compex: What sport do you do and how did you get into it?

    Christos: I started at a very young age the exciting sport of cycling. My inspiration was my father who is a former Coach of Greek National cycling team, so I literally loved this sport. Success came early in my career regarding several world and European level discriminations.

    In brief,  I was the first ever Greek Cyclist who won a Gold medal in World Championships. I earned 4 medals in World Championships, 9 medals in Europe Championships , 30 medals in World Cups and over 80 Gold Medals in Greece Championships

    I hold 11 national Records and I am in 1st place in world Rankings on the event of Scratch Race , 1st place in omnium Race and 3rd place on Point Race.

    I was voted 2nd best athlete in peoples voting following NBA mvp Giannis Antetokunbo and ahead of Tennis player Stefanos Tsitsipas. I was also voted as 4th best Greek athlete on journalist official voting for last season plus the best upcoming talent in my early years.

    I won 2 Gold Medals on the 2nd European Games in Minsk on 2019 and as a result I became the Flag Bearer Of Greece in the closing Ceremony. 

    I am so happy to be an Olympian athlete for 3 consecutive Olympic Games ( Beijing 200813th place – London 2012 9th place, & Rio 2016 13th place.

    For the last 20 years I have been serving with love and excitement this hard and impressive  sport which is so popular worldwide.

     

    Compex: How does Compex Muscle Stim help you to find a competitive edge?

    Christos: My sport and training are very demanding. I count on Compex for my continuous recovery and strength – endurance training to empower my body. Warming up my legs is vital before cycling. I really avoid injuries like this. I use on weekly basis endurance programs while cycling, plus dynamic strength training with extra weight. I always use recovery programs right after the training and I repeat them within the next 3 hours. I believe Compex is essential for all cyclists who want to improve.

     

    Compex: Which program/s do you use?

    Christos: In terms of training I use Endurance and Strength programs in dynamic trainings. I always use Warm Up or Overcompensation programs before trainings. Capillarization is also helping my legs to function better.

    For recovery I use competition / training recovery , Muscle pain and reduce Muscle Soreness  mainly. The end of the day finds me always with some reviving massage on my legs and my back.

     

    Compex: Do you use other Compex products? 

    Christos: Yes, I use Fixx 1.0 massage gun of course. It boosts my pain relief and relaxes my muscles after training. I also use it sometimes for warming up my legs.

  6. Compex Meets... Mevenig Rio

    Compex sat down with French Personal Trainer, Mevenig Rio, to discuss his experiences with Compex and how it can aid your training routine.

    I work in a gym, but also at home. My clientele is varied and interested in everything from health, returning to sports, aesthetics, self confidence, and weight loss, to more specific objectives related to weight training, running, cycling, and preparing for police or fireman contests.

    I began using Compex® in my own workouts to improve recovery. Once I had discovered its other features I used it for pain management, massage, and physical preparation. Then I used it with my clients in their personal training sessions, which gave them added value and improved my coaching.

    I use Compex® a lot in combined sessions; I combine voluntary exercises with Compex contraction to boost and energize my sessions and get results more quickly, and with both beginners and experienced athletes. It is the choice of the exercise associated with Compex® that will enable maximum muscle fibres, optimized training and help achieve better results.

    In terms of results for my clients, I have noticed a real gain in recovery, which is faster and allows for better quality sessions. In the treatment of muscle and tendinitis, Compex® relieves pain and promotes healing. On the physical preparation of runners or cyclists I have also seen real progress in terms of gaining strength while keeping the muscle mass gain. Gain in muscle tone is also much faster for users looking to lose weight or tone up.

    Compex® boosts and optimizes its sessions by targeting a specific work goal. Thanks to the good recovery it enables, it makes it easier to chain drives and prevent injuries. Best of all, Compex® allows you to complete your training and planning at home, meaning you can reach your goals much faster.

  7. Compex Meets... David Navarro

    Compex sits down with Spanish Personal Trainer, David Navarro.

    It seems that muscle stim has suddenly become fashionable, but the reality is that high level athletes and physiotherapists have been using Compex® for long enough to be able to attest to its success.

    Compex® is not a fad, it is a reality taken to the highest level. It enables users to recover and improve their muscle condition, muscle gain, movement, and quality of life, be it in sport or during their daily life challenges.

    As a personal trainer, I believe Compex® is best used to train for specific goals. My clients must trust that I am fully committed to helping them reach their goals, and I must be able to trust my tools.

    When explaining the training process to my clients, I make sure they understand that without the high-end technology of Compex®, certain goals will take a lot longer to achieve, and in some cases may be impossible.

    While I’ve used the Compex® Fit 5.0 to achieve a lot of different results, I find it most effective in helping my clients compensate their weaker muscle groups, and to strengthen and recover muscle structures compromised during sport or daily activities.

    One such client is Sara Lobla, a wedding photographer who suffers from back, shoulder and knee pain due to the physical demands of her job. When Sara is preparing for a wedding, I can take these demands into account when planning her training routine with Compex®. This helps me to know exactly what programmes to use during her training sessions.

    And just as athletes have down time, so Sara has periods with less work. This gives me a window to really focus on muscle training to give her more strength and resistance, allowing her to focus on her job.

    Working with 2 channels simplifies any type of workout and lets me focus on individual muscle groups without the need to deactivate additional channels that would be present on other devices.

    Sara has now successfully relieved her back, shoulder, and knee pain. Besides using the Compex® Fit 5.0 to improve her muscle condition, helping her to keep taking impressive photos, we also use this device to help her get in shape and tone her buttocks and abs.

    Ultimately, nothing escapes from the Compex® Fit 5.0!

  8. Compex Meets... Patricia Soave

    Patricia Soave, our expert trainer in Compex, will help you to get visible results the same way she does for her customers.

    In order to get the best out of her programmes, you have to follow 3 basic rules:

    1. Regularity => A muscle that is not stimulated regularly will not adapt. You have to train minimum 3 times a week by muscle group for 4 to 6 weeks in order to get visible results.

    2. Intensity => To the maximum bearable intensity in order to stimulate as many muscle fibres as possible. At the beginning, the contractions might surprise you and you may ache in the days following. This is normal, because EMS will enable you to develop an important quantity of muscle fibres, more than during a normal bodybuilding training session.

    3. Combination of proposed exercises during contraction phase => Will enable you to shorten your training sessions with maximum efficiency, without putting any strain on your joints, but with heavier loads. The strength of EMS combined with voluntary contractions will multiply the benefits of your session. You will get a real muscular benefit!

    Bio

    Director of Vertigo Diffusion and of Wellness Attitude based in Lausanne (Switzerland). Trainer at the Sports Department of Lausanne University since 1993 where she has trained more than 1500 fitness coaches. Personal trainer since 1995.

    As International Gymstick Master, Presenter, Lecturer and Judge, she has been invited to more than 20 countries and collaborates with prestigious companies.

  9. Compex Meets... Alexis Gsell, Patrice Paquier & Anael Huard

    Compex sat down with Alexis Gsell, Patrice Paquier & Anael Huard, who are members of the French Ski Federation, to discuss their experience integrating Compex with their ski training. 

    Most athletes havetheir own Compex that they use regularly sincethe launch of the brand (over 30 years ago). There arefour preferred uses: warming up the muscles, injury prevention, improved recovery and strength development.

    • For recovery, athletes use Compex in the late afternoon after a running or cycling session,
      using the programs Capillarisation and Active Recovery. These programs work well together for a superior
    • For injury treatment such as tendonitis or contractures, athletes use recovery programs to improve
      recovery time and reduce pain.
    • Regarding treatments post-injury such as ACL, Compex can be used under the supervision of a doctor with specific rehab programs. It is then used in combination with strength exercises to stimulate more muscle fibres. When an athlete is injured and cannot train, the use of Compex is also important to maintain a level of muscle activity in other areas of the body (not necessarily the injured ones).

    The ways in which you use Compex depends on your objectives.

  10. Compex Meets... Bernard Bonthoux

    Compex sit down with Osteopath, Bernand Bonthoux and discuss how he uses Compex to help treat skiers.

    An evolution in skiing techniques and materials has caused athletes to change their training methods and use electrostimulation.

    Previously, the post-injury period was often the only instance these devices were used. However, after being in the ski industry for 30 years, I have seen an increase in the use of Compex.

    A few years ago, every Nordic skier used electrical stimulation solely for recovery and Alpine skiers used it to increase strength; we can now say that the situation has completely changed.

    Use of Compex in Skiing:

    Compex can be an the ideal partner to help you warm up muscles, prevent injuries, recover better and faster, and even develop strength.

    This guide shows you 4 training plans:

    • Alpine Skiing: 4 weeks
    • Alpine Skiing: 8 weeks
    • Nordic Skiing: 5 weeks
    • Nordic Skiing: 10 weeks

    The 4 week program offers assistance for seasonal skiers and/or snowboarders. The primary goal of this preparation is to reduce the risk of injury and avoid the manifestation of aches and pains.

    Major muscle groups to be targeted:

    • Alpine and freestyle skiing: Quadriceps (knee ligaments injury prevention) and core
    • Nordic skiing: the recovery of the lower body muscle groups on Quadriceps and Triceps surae. The emergence of new competition standards, with
      more explosive speed requirements, engenders more intense muscle stim techniques such as strength building. The importance of the
      upper body is increasing as well and can be integrated into this program.
    • Snowboard: Quadriceps and abs

    Several rules to help you achieve your objectives:

    • The prerequisite for this training is to be in overall good shape and to train on a regular basis; obviously, the ski season is not just 4, 8 or even 10 weeks
      of training!
    • For people who are not used to muscle stimulation (especially the strengthening program), a 2-3 week initiation is highly recommended before starting
      with a training plan.
    • When you feel comfortable using the Compex device, you can add the Potentiation program to prepare the muscles before competitions.
    • Practicing a sport where you have to ‘seek’ snow can be challenging when travel is frequent and you don’t have a chance for a proper recovery session.
      Therefore it is essential to use the recovery programs.
    • Finally, for casual skiers, this tool can be considered a supplement to other sports activities throughout the year.

    Become a champion skier or just ski for fun; Compex will help either way!

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