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  1. How To Build Your Pecs Using Muscle stim by Compex

    In order to develop muscular qualities in general, muscle volume in particular, the force from electro-stimulation must essentially meet two requirements; ensuring a significant percentage of the muscle fibers are involved during each contraction, but also that the regime of work imposed to the stimulated muscle is adapted to develop the muscular mass.

    It is the quality of the stimulation pulses which allow for the in depth muscle fibers to work, without being limited beforehand by "electrical" pain. After a few sessions of familiarization with the technique, it is possible to reach maximum contractions only by the stimulation, as this has been demonstrated by Gilles Cometti at the University of Dijon.

    The workout plan designed by Compex for the chest is absolutely incredible with a quantity of cumulative work hardly feasible during a voluntary training session. Recall in effect, that one of the advantages specific to electro-stimulation is that the amount of work is not limited by the increase in heart rate or by the mental or psychical fatigue, as is the case during intensive voluntary training. This does not exclude the fact that the combination of the 2 forms of training is always recommended for obtaining the best results!

  2. Integrating Compex for Marathon Training

    WHEN TO START PREPARING

    • Each training plan lasts 10 weeks.
    • The prerequisite for this training is to be in overall good shape and to train on a regular basis for several months before the race.
    • For runners who are not used to muscle stimulation (especially with the strengthening Program) a 2-3 week initiation is highly recommended before starting with the 10 week training plan.

    marathon

    ADJUSTING STIMULATION INTENSITY IS THE KEY!

    For Programs inducing powerful muscular contractions (Endurance, Strength, Cross training, Core stabilization)
    Maximum toleration: It is crucial to reach the highest level of intensity possible (though the session must always remain bearable). Intensity
    determines the number of muscle fibers which are engaged or ‘recruited’ by the stimulation. The best way to determine your maximum toleration
    is simply through your own judgement of what your body can cope with. The contractions must be powerful without ever becoming intolerable.
    The progress of a stimulated muscle will be greater if the Compex device recruits a high number of its fibers.

    SEVERAL RULES TO HELP YOU ACHIEVE THIS:

    • Apply the electrodes according to the diagrams
    • Consider changing your electrodes on a regular basis. If the gel layer on the electrode deteriorates, it will be less conductive and you will not be
    able to achieve higher levels of stimulation.
    • Always look to progress:
    - Increase the intensity marginally every 3,4 or 5 contractions throughout a session.
    - In subsequent sessions aim to exceed the level of intensity reached in the previous session
    - It is often more comfortable to voluntarily contract the muscles, synchronised with the stimulation

    SIMILAR PROGRAMS ACROSS DIFFERENT COMPEX DEVICES

    Sometimes, Compex models will use different names to refer to the same program type. Below is a key so you can identify the correct program:
    • Capillarisation = Oxygenation
    • Core stabilization = Muscle building
    • Training recovery = Active recovery

    FOR TRAINING RECOVERY AND CAPILLARISATION PROGAMMES
    Increase the intensity gradually; it should produce visible muscular twitches

    DOWNLOAD THE TRAINING GUIDE

  3. Integrating Compex into Triathlon Training

    HOW TO USE COMPEX IMPORTANT TIPS

    • This booklet offers three training plans: one for the short-distance triathlon, one for a Half-Ironman 70.3 triathlon (L) and a one for a Full-Ironman 140.6 triathlon (XL). The training plans outlined in this manual, incorporating the Compex sessions, are designed to run 10, 12 and 16 weeks respectively.
    • The prerequisite for this training is overall good physical condition with regular physical activity during the month previous to starting the training plan. It is recommended to have completed a shorter triathlon before preparing for the longer distance.
    • For triathletes who have never practiced electrostimulation, including qualitative sessions (endurance, strength, cross-training), an initiation period of 2 to 3 weeks is highly recommended before starting this full training regime.

    SETTING THE INTENSITY IS THE KEY TO SUCCEED

    For Development sessions (Endurance, Strength, Resistance, Core stabilization)
    Maximum toleration: It is crucial to reach the highest level of intensity possible (though the session must always remain bearable). Intensity determines the number of muscle fibers which are engaged or ‘recruited’ by the stimulation. The best way to determine your maximum toleration is simply through your own judgement of what your body can cope with. The contractions must be powerful without ever becoming intolerable.
    The progress of a stimulated muscle will be greater if the Compex device recruits a high number of its fibers.
    Some general rules to help you train:

    • Observe the electrode placements indicated and note their polarity (+ and - ). For wireless devices: the + polarity is located on the electrodes where there is an on / off button; for wired models, the + polarity comes from the color wire (*for older generation devices, the + polarity is located alongside the red connector. 
    • Consider changing your electrodes on a regular basis. If the gel layer on the electrode deteriorates, it will be less conductive and you will not be able to achieve higher levels of stimulation.
    • Always look to progress:
      • Increase the intensity marginally every 3,4 or 5 contractions throughout a session.
      • In subsequent sessions aim to exceed the level of intensity reached in the previous session
      • It is often more comfortable to voluntarily contract the muscles, synchronised with the stimulation

    For Training recovery and Capillarization sessions:
    Increase the intensity gradually; it should produce visible muscular twitches.

    DOWNLOAD THE TRAINING GUIDE

  4. Integrating Electrostimulation into Fitness Training

    REGULARITY: THE KEY TO SUCCESS!

    You have a wonderful tool… the best training partner to sculpt your body and tone and shape your muscles. Patricia Soave, our expert trainer in Compex®, will help you to get visible results the same way she does for her customers.

    In order to get the best out of her programmes, you have to follow 3 basic rules:

    1) Regularity => A muscle that is not stimulated regularly will not adapt. You have to train minimum 3 times a week by muscle group for 4 to 6 weeks in order to get visible results.
    2) Intensity => To the maximum bearable intensity in order to stimulate as many muscle fibresas possible. At the beginning, the contractions might surprise you and you may ache in the days following. This is normal, because EMS will enable you to develop an important quantity of muscle fibres, more than during a normal bodybuilding training session.
    3) Combination of proposed exercises during contraction phase => Will enable you to shorten your training sessions with maximum efficiency, without putting any strain on your joints, but with heavier loads. The strength of EMS combined with voluntary contractions will multiply the benefits of your session. You will get a real muscular benefit!

    Read more

  5. BodyPower 2017

    Compex will be at the 2017 BodyPower (may 12th- 14th ) at the NEC in Birmingham. Started in 2009, BodyPower UK has grown into the most celebrated and comprehensive fitness event in the UK, attracting, inspiring and motivating 90,000 plus health and fitness enthusiasts over three days.

     

     

    Compex will be in hall 20 at the BodyPower Expo, performing demonstrations and providing free recovery to all athletes competing at the event. Looking forward to see you all there!

    A look back at the Bodypower 2016:

  6. How To Improve Your Workout with Compex

    Functional training combines gymnastics, weights and endurance sports.

    Functional training athletes have to be proficient in a huge variety of disciplines. They run, row, climb rope, jump, move objects and practice Olympic weightlifting movements using dumbbells, gymnastic rings, boxes, kettlebells, bags and other items which serve as training aids.

    Functional training focuses on the development of ten athletic skills:cardiovascular and respiratory endurance, muscular endurance, strength, flexibility, power,speed, agility, psychomotor, balance and accuracy. The aim is to develop the capacity totrain with greater intensity for extended periods, utilising a variety of muscle groups.

     

    The WOD (Workout of the Day) is built around three principles:

    1. The movements are functional, or in other words, natural and easily transferable to everyday life: pushing, pulling, jumping, running or lifting a heavy object.
    2. The training is constantly varied. Rather than allowing the body to sink into a familiar routine or rhythm, and thus lessening the benefit received from the workout, functional training means you never know what to expect; training might include circuits one day (a sequence of exercises in a given time or for a set number of repetitions) and a singular activity the next: running or pure strength (such as deadlifting, backsquat or shoulder pressing).
    3. Training is always at high intensity; flirt with your own limitations: run as fast as possible, raise the bar with more weight, push yourself.

    Compex can be an the ideal partner to help you warm up the muscles, prevent injuries, recover better and faster, and even develop strength.

    In the next few pages you’ll see outlined the Compex programs recommended for functional training athletes...

    READ MORE

  7. Compex Sport & Fitness Electrostimulation Programme List | Compex

    Full list of programs per device in the Compex Fitness & Sport range below or download PDF

    LIST OF PROGRAMS FITNESS RANGE SPORT RANGE
    FIT 1.0 (wire) FIT 3.0 (wire) FIT 5.0 (wireless) SP 2.0  (wire) SP 4.0  (wire) SP 6.0  (wireless) SP 8.0 (wireless)
                                 CONDITIONING 0 0 0 7 10 10 13
    Endurance To improve performance for endurance sports    
    Resistance To improve ability to provide sustained effort      
    Strength To increase maximum strength and speed of muscle contraction    
    Explosive Strength To improve explosivity    
    Muscle building To increase muscle tone and volume    
    Warm-up To prepare muscles before a competition      
    Capillarisation To increase blood flow      
    Cross-training To train different muscle work through different working sequences      
    Core stabilisation To strengthen the abs and lower back        
    Hypertrophy To increase significantly muscle volume      
    Overcompensation To improve endurance or muscle resistance in precompetitive phase            
    Ankle twist prevention To improve ankle strength            
    Potentiation To prepare muscle before competition (short distance)            
                                     FITNESS 8 9 14 4 5 5 10
    Firm your arms To recover muscle firmness
    Tone your thighs To work on toning thighs
    Firm your stomach To regain a slimmer waist
    Shape you buttocks To tone and firm buttocks
    Get a 6-pack To strengthen and tone the abs  
    Build your pecs To increase pecs muscle volume      
    Get stronger biceps To increase biceps muscle volume        
    Lymphatic drainage To treat swelling of the feet and ankles      
    Build your shoulders To increase shoulders muscle volume          
    Body power To improve muscle strength with a slight increase in volume          
    Muscle building To increase muscle tone and volume        
    Capillarisation To increase blood flow          
    Cross-training To train different muscle work through different working sequences          
    Warm-up To prepare muscles before a competition            
    Strengthen quads To improve quads strength            
                        RECOVERY / MASSAGE 1 2 4 3 5 5 5
    Relaxing massage To generate a relaxing effect
    Training recovery To recover after a physical effort    
    Reduce muscle soreness To reduce duration and intensity of muscle soreness    
    Reviving massage To relieve feelings of tiredness    
    Competition recovery To recover after an intense muscle fatigue        
                            PAIN MANAGEMENT 1 8 10 6 8 8 10
    Pain management TENS  To alleviate all types of localised pain
    Reduce muscle tension To decrease muscle tension  
    Muscle pain To create analgesic actions to block pain  
    Back pain To reduce pains in the back
    Heavy legs To eliminate heavy legs sensation  
    Cramp prevention To prevent cramp  
    Neck pain To reduce pains in the neck    
    Tendinitis To decrease persistent tendinitis pains    
    Lumbago To block the transmission of acute lower back pain          
    Epicondilitis To decrease persistent elbow pains          
                             REHABILITATION 0 1 2 0 2 2 2
    Muscle atrophy To regain muscle volume on a muscle that has been inactive for a long period    
    Reinforcement To complete rehabilitation once the muscles have reached their normal volume    
    TOTAL PROGRAMS 10 20 30 20 30 30 40
  8. What is Muscle Stimulation?

    What is electrostimulation and how it works?

    Electrostimulation is now an integral part of physiotherapy and pain management protocols. It has been a technique used by physical therapists for many years. Today, many leading athletes use electrostimulation in their training programme to optimise results. It is a perfect solution to prevent injuries and give the muscles the exact treatment they need at a certain point of time in a training schedule.

    Electrostimulation is not a miraculous technique; it respects how your body works.
    The principle of electrostimulation is very simple. It precisely reproduces the processes that occur when our brain orders muscles to contract. When we decide to contract a muscle, our brain sends a signal in the form of an electric current that travels at high speed along the nerve fibres up to the muscle, which reacts by contracting.

    In the case of electrostimulation, excitation occurs directly on the motor nerve using electrical pulses perfectly controlled to guarantee effectiveness, safety and comfort in use. In fact, muscles cannot tell the difference between a voluntary contraction (triggered by the brain) and an electrically induced contraction: the work done is exactly the same. It's completely natural!

  9. Compex Athlete Josh Amberger’s Favorite Program

    We caught up with Compex triathlete Josh Amberger to talk about his favorite Compex program he uses and how he incorporates it into his weekly workout routine. Here’s what Josh had to say:

    "I love the strength mode on my Compex and I use it twice weekly to compliment my strength sessions on the bike. We can only stress the heart and lungs to a certain point before fatigue, but I find I can use the Compex in strength mode to get a little bit more from the muscles without stressing the heart and lungs beyond the bike ride. Once I get in the door from a key bike ride, I prepare a meal and then sit down to eat whilst dialing the Compex into a strength program. The strength program has different levels of operation, which I can adjust depending on how hard and low I pushed on the bike, what training I have tomorrow, and how far away from a key event I am. It’s the perfect mode for going one step further in my training."

    Connect with Josh and follow him on Facebook.com/Josh.Amberger and Twitter.com/JoshAmberger

  10. IRONMAN World Championship: Andy Potts

    Compex Interview with Andy Potts (Professional triathlete and 2007 IRONMAN 70.3 World Champion)

    After finishing in the top 5 last year have you done anything different for your preparation this time? Every year, I am always trying to introduce different things, so we are constantly improving. Contrary to most triathlon advice, I try something new every race too. Sometimes it works and sometimes it’s a flop but it helps me learn and get better. In preparation for Kona, one year, we tried to do more moto-pacing, another year I spent a month out on Big Island before the race. This year, my focus has been on a few key things- A specific focus on the bike, given how important it has been to the race in recent years, and recovery. My recovery routine has developed extensively and is as important to my racing success as any other element. Some of the key things I am doing include active stretching for about 30 minutes each day, weekly massage, daily use of my Compex Muscle Stimulator and a renewed focus on nutrition pre and post workout.

    What’s your pre-race meal?

    I try to keep it really simple and fairly light pre-race. I will eat what’s available but typically stay away from foods high in fiber as that could be dangerous on race day.

    How do you include Compex in your daily routine?

    I typically use Compex during and after my stretching routine. With that, I sometimes use Compex at the beginning of the day as a way to activate my muscles and also provide a little bit of ‘work’ before I head out for the day. [andy-potts-compex-athlete]

    What’s one piece of advice you would give some who wants to do an Ironman?

    First thing is listen to your heart. If Ironman is something that you will both enjoy and challenge you, jump right in. I highly recommend racing all types of events and distances, not just Ironman. There is an amazing network of local races at varying distances that provide a great opportunity to race locally, connect with your community, make friends and learn a lot about racing and yourself. In addition, it’s important to to make a commitment to yourself by eating right, gaining strength, and learning about your new pursuit. The last step would be to reach out to trusted people to find out how you can get more engaged and dive in. What’s the one thing you look forward to most after swimming 2.4 miles, biking 112 miles and running a marathon? I love the finish chute. There is so much energy and excitement. Whether you are first or 50th, there is a real energy that gets me pumped. A big part of the finishing chute for me is seeing my wife and family. There is nothing more important to me in the world than them and being able to see them after a hard fought day is truly special.

    What’s one thing people may be surprised you eat out on the race course?

    My race day diet has really refined itself over time. I am almost exclusively on Powerbar products, so nothing too earth shattering there. It wasn’t always that way and I have experimented with everything from muffins in my bento box(btw- they get really crumby) to skittles in my special needs bag. WATCH LIVE footage of the IRONMAN Kona World Championships here: IronMan.com To learn more about integrating Compex electric muscle stimulation into your workouts visit our Compex Training page, and to discover more information about electric muscle stimulation visit our page on How Electric Muscle Stimulation Works.

    Stay Connect with Andy Potts by following him on his social media channels:

    Facebook.com/AndyPottsRacing

    Twitter.com/Andy_Potts

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